Saturday, August 3, 2019

How Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm After They've Seen Mykonos?


The Farm

Jeff—Saturday

That question, set out as the title for this piece, is borrowed from the lyric of a popular World War I song utilizing Paris as the pastoral antithesis, but it seems clearly directed at the contrast between my life on Mykonos—the embodied epitome of midsummer hedonistic madness (an admitted overabundance of modifiers—but appropriate for making the point)—and August on an utterly rural, northwestern New Jersey 18th Century farm.

Amish signature and date on a chestnut beam in the "new" barn

I’m not sure I can as effectively convey in words what makes the dichotomy work so well for me as I can in photographs. You all know what Mykonos looks like—or can easily find thousands of photos that display it in heart-stopping detail—but here are photos of the place that keeps me rooted to a different sort of life. 

This morning that life had me finally getting my pick-up truck running again (overcoming a dead battery and two flat tires), getting the hot water working again (a circulator pump replacement required), transferring a barn stall’s worth of stored furniture to the front and rear porches of the farm house (so that my late-afternoon-arriving grandchildren and their parents had a place to sit), and running to tractor supply and farm stores for all sorts of vittles, equipment, and critter battling necessities.

AND I LOVE EVERY MINUTE OF IT.  Here’s why:


For those of you looking for mystery, imagine what this was used for in the middle of the woods
For action, there's always the diner...especially for Friday the 13th fans.

Ahhh, Sleep, perchance to dream...or scream.

 —Jeff

8 comments:

  1. We understand the split personality lifestyle well. . .and as August gets underway in Greece, wonder why we haven't followed in your footsteps (once again)!

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    1. It took me a quarter of a century to realize the error of my ways, so you have time. :)

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  2. Looks lovely, Jeff. But I could do without the motor repairs!

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    1. It so happens the mechanic is a great guy, but on opening the barn, finding two flat tires, a dead battery--and later on no AC in 37C weather--was a definite downer.

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  3. I'll take the farm every time, thank you. Welcome home!

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    1. As the farmer said when he was kissing his horse, "It's all a matter of taste."

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    2. Have you never heard the saying "Never kiss a gift horse on the mouth," Jeff?

      Um, to be a pedant, isn't 1849 the 19th Century rather than the 18th, or is the farm far older...? (That would account for it being the 'new' barn, after all...)

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    3. Nay, on the horse kissing moment. :)

      I was wondering who would point out the difference in centuries, and Sharp eyes caught it.:) Yes, the older part of the barn and oldest part of the house go back to the late 1700s...considered modern by UK standards.

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